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May, 2009:

Alai on Tibetan language

By Kyabchen Dedrol (See the original article in Tibetan)

Alai, a writer of some repute in the PRC, grew up in an environment strongly influenced by Chinese culture, and the reason why his writings have attracted quite a high degree of interest is his choice of topic which he describes u982p112t3d184801f48dt2005051816200111with affected naïveté as primarily relating “the transformation of Tibetan society”, and so “tearing away the mask of secrecy” for the ordinary reader unacquainted with Tibet. In his case, in order to make a living out of writing, he depends upon two firm footholds: one is his theatrical “Tibet”, and the other is his fan following of Chinese readers. Without either of these, Alai’s writings would not be marketable, as everyone knows. (more…)

New Discovery of Tibetan Muslims

By Lhamkog (See the orginal article in Tibetan)

Whilst the spread of Islam in other countries and among other ethnic groups has been strong, there has been no development of Islam amongst Tibetans. Were there any official restrictions on the spread of Islam in Tibet? This has been one of my longstanding doubts. The following is from a recent conversation between a friend of mine and his Muslim prison mate.

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A group of young Tibetan Muslim migrants in Kalimpong, India. 1965

(See more photos, click here)

My friend told me that not only did his Muslim prison mate claim his ancestors were Tibetan, he also claimed that he was a Tibetan Muslim and showed respect to Tibetans and regarded Tibetan monks with high esteem. Furthermore it is said that when the Muslim was happy he would sing some Tibetan Lu (Amdo folk songs) and Lashey (Amdo love songs) that many urban Tibetan youths have never heard of in order to console himself. Another amusing remark was that the Muslim looked down on Chinese speaking Muslims by calling them Gyahui (Chinese Muslim). (more…)

Why do we Blog?

By Rigyam (See the original article in Tibetan)

As Blogging is relatively new to us, we are just about becoming aware of its importance in our society. According to outsiders, people publish blogs to further the objective of their professions. If this is the case, then many bloggers in Tibet have no such objectives. I have no any purpose in publishing posts on my blog, too.

Blogging is really curious as many people can read immediately what is posted. With a computer (I choose to use the word “computer” as the exile Tibetans are used to it) and internet access, one can publish articles in accordance with one’s own wishes without the need for approval by a magazine editor; nor the hassle of having one’s specially chosen of words with specific meanings deleted by others indiscriminately. (more…)